Keith Oliver, a fraud specialist at Peters & Peters gave expert commentary regarding Europcar’s accusations of fraudulently overcharging its customers for repairs, the Trading Standards is investigating. In response to one example where a customer, Mr Kramsky, had been quoted vastly different prices for a windscreen repair, Keith said “If in fact the true cost of the repairs was significantly less than the figure contained in the invoiced or that advised to Mr Kramsky as being the ‘cost of repairs’ then, on the face of it, he has been seriously misled.” Keith continued “a grossly inflated charge to Mr Kramsky, if that is what has happened, is obviously a serious matter given the elastic nature of the relevant provisions of the Fraud Act, which by virtue of sections 2, 3 and 4 impose criminal sanctions for dishonestly failing to disclose to another person information which one is under a legal duty to disclose. A grossly inflated repair charge which bears little resemblance to the true cost could well fall foul of these provisions.”

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